I'm Julia Dimakos.

I'LL HELP YOU MAKE YOUR GARDEN BETTER

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These are the EXACT same steps I followed in turning my otherwise
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My Greenhouse Tour #2

My Greenhouse Tour #2

It’s been about a month since I planted the first seeds in the greenhouse and the days have become shorter. The weather has changed from summer to fall and the winds have picked up.

In a typical year, this would be typical weather for the season. However, in my case, I’ve embarked on a new adventure and already started learning and adapting. It’s definitely taking my mind off of what is happening outside.

From my first greenhouse video, to this second video, we’ve had to make several adaptations, to account for the high winds and the possibility of the greenhouse blowing away or being damaged. We’ve had a few leaks in the roof as well. I’ve also finished seeding the greenhouse and harvested my first vegetables!

It’s been an exciting time. Watch the second video in my greenhouse series and join me in my world.


My New Greenhouse Tour

A Walkthrough Tour of My Greenhouse

When we moved to our country home, I felt excited about building my dream kitchen garden. I researched ideas and designed it based on our family’s needs.

But, gardening season is relatively short in relation to the length of one-year, so I dreamt of ways to extend my gardening season. My garden is located over 400 feet away from the house, so trekking there in mid-winter, through hip-deep snow, to reach cold frames was unrealistic. Plus, opening the garden door would be next to impossible, due to all the snow.

I needed something close to the house, that would be easy to access and fulfill all my gardening needs throughout the summer and into fall, early winter, then very early spring.

I wanted something that I would be able to grow tomatoes, peppers and cucumbers in during the summer and hardy salad greens in the fall, early winter and early spring.

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An Easy Recipe for Fermented Dill Pickles

An Easy Recipe for Fermented Dill Pickles

As the end of summer approaches, I get excited thinking about preserving my harvest. What can I do with my garden bounty, to feed my friends and family for the rest of the year?

One of my favourite ways to preserve food is through fermentation.

So many foods are fermented, some of them well known and others unexpected. Pickles and sauerkraut are the most common fermented foods. Tofu, coffee and wine are probably the most surprising.

Fermentation is easier to do than most think. The end result is a delicious and healthy preserved food.

Read on for an easy recipe for fermented pickles.

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Video: How to Pollinate Zucchini for a Bigger Harvest

How to Pollinate Zucchini for a Bigger Harvest

When I think of zucchini, I think of abundance. You plant one zucchini plant and it produces so much fruit, that you end up giving it away to family, friends and all your neighbours.

Thanks to changing climatic conditions and a lack of pollinators, zucchini plants aren’t producing as prolifically as they once did.

What does zucchini need in order to produce lots of fruit? Sunshine, heat and regular pollination.

Zucchini is not self-pollinating. It has male and female flowers that require the assistance of bees and bumblebees to fly from male flowers, collect pollen, then disperse the pollen to the pistils of female flowers.

What doesn’t zucchini need? Cool temperatures, persistent rain and absent pollinators.

Unfortunately in today’s conditions, if you’re looking for a bumper zucchini crop, you’ll need to step in and carry out the pollinator’s role.

Watch this video, where I show you how to easily hand pollinate your zucchini plants, in order to have a much larger harvest. All you need is a paintbrush!

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1 Simple Tip for Cleaning Salad Greens

1 Simple Tip for Cleaning Salad Greens

How do you clean your freshly harvested salad greens?

Have you ever struggled with cleaning out all of the dirt and bugs from between your lettuces, swiss chard, kale, beet greens, herbs, arugula and any other cuttings? I have!

1 Simple Tip for Cleaning Salad Greens

My Salad Spinner

I used to work between sink, strainer and bowl and back again, rinsing and straining and it would take forever! I would place a large portion of the salad greens in one bowl, fill it with water, lift the greens out and into another bowl, which I would fill with water, lift up and back into the first bowl, to start the process all over again. Then I would use a strainer, then lay out my salad between paper towels to soak up the water. It took forever. At the end of a long and tiring day in the garden, I often left the salad soaking in a bowl overnight, to become stinky by morning. It was a big waste of time and effort!

Now I use one simple tool and it does all the work of straining, rinsing and soaking for me.

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